The Yogic View of Consciousness 7: The Absolute According to Hermann Weyl

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We close out discussing the Absolute considering the ideas of Hermann Wyle, who made important contributions to 20th century math and science. Wyle’s views provide a natural fit with the yogic view of consciousness and illustrate the integration of science, philosophy, and religion. The example he sets should shame those modern-day scientists and philosophers who see only antagonism where Wyle saw harmony.

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What is Science? Part 10: Everything in the world is a network of unintelligible relations

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“They decided to establish an academy in Lagado to develop new theories on agriculture and construction and to initiate projects to improve the lives of the city’s inhabitants…”

 

Summary: Part 10 closes out the essay by elaborating on the relationship between consciousness and power and discusses the opposite ways that power is used by scientists and yogis.

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What is Science? Part 4: Everything’s All Mixed Up

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Emulsions courtesy of Orbiting Frog

Emulsions courtesy of Orbiting Frog

Summary: This is part 4 of a 10 part essay that suggests we can think of science as a weak form of samadhi. In Part 4, we roll up our sleeves and start getting technical and discuss the yogic theory of knowledge that underlies what occurs in samadhi.

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What is Science? Part 2: Hanging in the Middle

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Summary: This is part 2 of a 10 part essay that suggests we can think of science as a weak form of samadhi.  Part 2 closes out the discussion of the demarcation problem, and introduces additional ingredients of the discussion: the subjective/objective dichotomy, yoga, and samadhi.

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What is Science? Part 1: The Demarcation Problem

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Blind men feeling the elephant.

Blind men feeling the elephant.

Summary: This is part 1 of a 10 part essay that suggests we can think of science as a weak form of samadhi.  Part 1 lays out our basis by trying to figure out how science is distinguished form other forms of human activity, which is called “the demarcation problem”.

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Möbius strips, the bindu, and moving amongst the planes

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mobius-stripe

Summary: There is some specific feature of consciousness that allows it to move among the different planes.  The most obvious is the idea of “rate of vibration”.  But this doesn’t account for the main dichotomy of consciousness where a subjective self seems embedded in an objective external world.  The main idea I explore here is that consciousness is like a Möbius strip: it seems to have two sides, but really only has one side.  This Möbius property is what allows consciousness to transfer from one plane to the next.  Yoga has long known this property to exist and calls it “bindu”; a hole in consciousness that, as I speculate here, may be the “fold” that allows consciousness to literally shift from pointing in one direction to pointing into another direction, e.g. into another plane.

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