The Yogic View of Consciousness 7: The Absolute According to Hermann Weyl

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We close out discussing the Absolute considering the ideas of Hermann Wyle, who made important contributions to 20th century math and science. Wyle’s views provide a natural fit with the yogic view of consciousness and illustrate the integration of science, philosophy, and religion. The example he sets should shame those modern-day scientists and philosophers who see only antagonism where Wyle saw harmony.

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The Graspable and the Ungraspable

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chaitin-2 coverIn a conversation with a friend the other day, I mentioned this video by Greg Chaitin. Being the nerd I am, I re-watched it for about the 5th time. Doing so brought to mind ideas I had been meaning to express, but then forgot, but then remembered again on watching the video. It’s basically a meta-theory of knowledge…

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What is Science? Part 4: Everything’s All Mixed Up

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Emulsions courtesy of Orbiting Frog

Emulsions courtesy of Orbiting Frog

Summary: This is part 4 of a 10 part essay that suggests we can think of science as a weak form of samadhi. In Part 4, we roll up our sleeves and start getting technical and discuss the yogic theory of knowledge that underlies what occurs in samadhi.

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What is Science? Part 2: Hanging in the Middle

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Summary: This is part 2 of a 10 part essay that suggests we can think of science as a weak form of samadhi.  Part 2 closes out the discussion of the demarcation problem, and introduces additional ingredients of the discussion: the subjective/objective dichotomy, yoga, and samadhi.

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What is Science? Part 1: The Demarcation Problem

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Blind men feeling the elephant.

Blind men feeling the elephant.

Summary: This is part 1 of a 10 part essay that suggests we can think of science as a weak form of samadhi.  Part 1 lays out our basis by trying to figure out how science is distinguished form other forms of human activity, which is called “the demarcation problem”.

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